VegMichigan Highlights

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A nonprofit organization promoting awareness of the health, environmental and ethical benefits of a plant-based diet.




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VegMichigan/VegNews Magazine


Great News!! VegNews is Back!!

VegMichigan members will once again receive 6 free issues of VegNews annually starting with the January issue.

VegNews went under reorganization and was not available for a period of time.

Thankfully, it is back.

Now, for the price of a $30 VegMichigan membership, you will receive VegNews, a $36 retail value, and free admission to VegFest, a $15 value.

That’s a $51 benefit for a $30 membership.

And of course, your contribution goes to a non-profit, all volunteer organization that continually promotes your good health, your environment and animal compassion.

You can join, or renew you membership at

You must be a member by November 16 to receive the January issue.


Guinness Beer Is Going Vegan


Guinness, the Irish stout that once famously advertised itself under the slogan “Guinness is good for you,” took a step this week to inject 21st-century food culture into its 256-year-old product. Guinness is going vegan.

The company announced on Monday that starting at the end of 2016, its beer will no longer contain trace amounts of fish bladder, an integral part of its filtration process.

Few customers — except perhaps vegans and vegetarians who enjoy a pint — were probably even aware that the famous inky-black drink contained any fish parts at all. But it is actually quite common for cask beers to be filtered using isinglass, a gelatinlike substance derived from the dried swim bladders of fish that is used to separate out unwanted solids like yeast particles from a brew, the company said.

“Isinglass has been used widely within the brewing industry as a means of filtration for decades,” the company said in a statement on Monday after a report in The Times of London. “However, because of its use we could not label Guinness as suitable for vegetarians and have been looking for an alternative solution for some time.”

Vegan Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies


Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Cookies
makes 2 dozen cookies

1.5 C all purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 C packed brown sugar
1/2 C vegetable oil
1.5 C pumpkin puree
1/4 C applesauce
1/2 tsp vanilla
1/2 C vegan chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350.

Whisk together the oil and the brown sugar. Add in the pumpkin, applesauce, and vanilla and combine. In another bowl mix together the flour, salt, baking soda, and baking powder.
Add the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and mix well. Stir in your chocolate chips.

Using a spoon or cookie scoop, drop the cookie batter onto a greased baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes.

Report: U.S. Dairy Alternatives Market Worth $2.09 Billion and Growing


Take one look at the “dairy” aisle in your local Walmart, and it’s clear that consumers are steering away from cow’s milk. It begs the question: with the myriad of milk alternatives, does anyone even drink the real thing anymore?

According to the data — less people consume the bovine liquid than ever before. A new report “Dairy Alternatives Market by Type, Formulation, Application, & by Region – Global Forecast to 2020” (by MarketsandMarkets) catalogs the massive growth in the non-dairy market, and how it’s attributable to people’s changing tastes and dietary needs.

“The dairy alternative market in U.S. is expected to mark a growth of 13.2% between 2015 and 2018 based on the strength of diversification in market,” says Shivani Mishra, research analyst in the food & beverage domain for MarketsandMarkets. “In 2015, the U.S. market size of dairy alternatives is estimated to be worth $2.09 billion and is one of the largest markets in the North American food & beverage industry.” As far as the global market, it’s projected to reach about $19.5 Billion by 2020, growing about 15.5% from 2015 to 2020.

“Increase in health awareness, growing preference towards vegan diet, and change in the lifestyles have stimulated growth in the dairy alternatives market,” Mishra adds.

5 Spooky and Healthy Vegan Halloween Treats


Halloween treats don’t have to mean store-bought candies! Check out our recipes for healthy vegan Halloween treats, based on vegetables and fruits.

400 Million Fewer Animals Were Killed for Food Last Year vs. 2007 Because People are Eating Less Meat


From comments by Governor Brown to reports from the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, there’s widespread agreement that everyone needs to eat more plants.

Where there’s less consensus, however, is how to effect change. While many vegans believe Meatless Mondays and other cutting-back-consumption campaigns don’t push enough of a paradigm-shift, others argue that these are crucial first steps towards a more compassionate world.

Given that around 93 percent of people still eat meat, it’s difficult to imagine that everyone will cease doing so anytime soon. A world that eats far less meat, however, is already on the way. Meat consumption has been steadily declining in the U.S.—by 10% per capita since 2007, in fact.

In that year, for example, the U.S. raised and killed 9.5 billion land animals for food. As of 2014, that number plummeted by a whopping 400 million (to 9.1 billion — click here to view the statistics), says Paul Shapiro, Vice President, Farm Animal Protection for The Humane Society of the United States.

“What that means is that compared to 2007, last year almost half a billion fewer animals were subjected to the torment of factory farming and industrial slaughter plants–and that’s despite the increase in the U.S. population,” Shapiro explains.

“That’s more animals than are experimented on, hunted, used in circuses, puppy mills, and end up in animal shelters each year in the U.S.—all combined.



What’s Wrong with Backyard Eggs?


What’s Wrong with Backyard Eggs?

by Christine Wells

Post image for What’s Wrong with Backyard Eggs?

Vegans are accustomed to being asked certain questions:  How can you live without cheese? (Easily and with clean arteries); Where do you get your protein? (Ask a gorilla); What if you and a pig were stranded on a desert island? (….what?).  But we also get asked just as frequently (though somewhat less facetiously) about backyard chickens being kept specifically for eggs.

Initially, raising backyard chickens may seem to address a number of problems from the perspective of avoiding industrialized farming, buying local, and animal welfare. However, as we look more closely at the reality of the backyard chicken trend, it becomes increasingly clear that it is the same commodification of animals, packaged in niche marketing to appeal to the modern “conscious consumer”.

It’s easy to conceptualize the relationship as one of respectful symbiosis in which the backyard farmer provides food and shelter to her flock in exchange for the “gift” of hens’ eggs.  However, this bucolic portrayal ignores several essential ethical questions, not the least of which being the fundamental issue of whether humans have the right to breed other animals for our own purposes, and whether it is appropriate for us to conclude that a hen “doesn’t care” whether someone other than herself decides what happens to her eggs.

Unless the individual in question actually rescues their chickens from exploitative situations, the vast majority of backyard chickens originate from the same breeding industry that provides chicks to large-scale farming operations. As a result, virtually all backyard chickens come from industrial hatcheries that employ the same brutal measures that are standard among factory farms (including debeaking) even though the prospective buyer is encouraged to believe otherwise through careful packaging of the “product.”

Like commercial and industrial egg producers, the backyard farm has considerably less use for roosters than for egg-laying hens.  In fact, roosters are frequently illegal in the same municipal areas where hens are permissable.  Hence, male chicks, which (as one would expect) make up 50% of all chicks hatched, are considered expendable and are treated as such, including being killed using the most “cost-effective” means (which often involves being ground up alive, suffocation, or simply letting them die of starvation or exposure in dumpsters).

The sexing of chicks is not an easy business, so even with the employment of such callous measures, there are many male chicks who make it through the sexing process, and end up being sold as females, only to later be rejected by the very households who purchased them. These unwanted and frequently illegal roosters end up, at best, in farm animal sanctuaries, or local animal shelters with cats and dogs where they will ultimately be “euthanized”.  Hens, too, when their egg productivity wanes later in life and they are no longer wanted, are frequently placed in similar circumstances, unless their owners simply slaughter or sell them for meat beforehand.

We can also look at this issue by widening our scope substantially to consider the very concept of participating in domestication.  Domestication is the ongoing process of manipulating another species so that they are more usable as resources for human consumption.  In factory farms, we can see this process continued even more invasively in the genetically manipulated animals who grow so much and so quickly that their legs cannot support the weight of their own bodies.

We have bred farmed animals into a state of constant dependence such that their continued existence actually relies on our intervention.  This is particularly relevant to backyard chickens, as they are very vulnerable to predators, including cats, snakes, foxes, and birds of prey.  And if you live in an area where raising chickens is a possibility, it is quite likely that these creatures–whose right to life and survival is just as valid–will also be present.  And with the staggering number of homeless animals in the world, breeding more into existence under the thin guise of locavorism is a completely unwarranted and counterproductive measure.

If you really care about chickens and have the means to support and protect them—including the cost of veterinary care, which can be considerable–consider getting involved in rescue work.  Depending on where you live, traditionally farmed animals are sometimes brought into shelters most generally used for dogs and cats, and are just as much in need of being saved from the gas chamber or lethal injection.

There is no shortage of animals needing refuge and protection.  Consider offering the safety of your backyard as a sanctuary to a homeless animal instead of purchasing one as a resource.


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Upcoming Events

6:30 pm VegMichigan Thanks-Living Vegan ... @ Troy, Michigan
VegMichigan Thanks-Living Vegan ... @ Troy, Michigan
Nov 28 @ 6:30 pm – 10:00 pm
VegMichigan’s Annual Vegan Thanks-Living Potluck Dinner will be held in Troy on Saturday, November 28th. The festivities will begin at ... Read More >
6:30 pm Ann Arbor Vegan Meetup Group @ Seva
Ann Arbor Vegan Meetup Group @ Seva
Nov 30 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Join us after Thanksgiving at this Ann Arbor vegetarian institution.  Plenty of entrees to choose from so bring a friend! ... Read More >
all-day VegMichigan’s December Metro Det... @ Ferndale Public Library
VegMichigan’s December Metro Det... @ Ferndale Public Library
Dec 1 all-day
Please check out our library display, located at Ferndale Public Library, 222 E. 9 Mile Rd., Ferndale, Michigan. Contact person ... Read More >
7:00 pm VegMichigan’s Vegan 101 Cooking ... @ Rochester Hills Whole Foods
VegMichigan’s Vegan 101 Cooking ... @ Rochester Hills Whole Foods
Dec 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Attendees will learn the nutritional aspects of a plant-based diet and taste samples of the prepared food. These classes are ... Read More >
6:00 pm Greater Lansing Vegan Dinner Club @ Clerical Technical Union - MSU
Greater Lansing Vegan Dinner Club @ Clerical Technical Union - MSU
Dec 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Open to everyone. Please arrive by 5:45 pm. For more information contact:  517-332-7898 or #meetup_oembed .mu_clearfix:after { visibility: hidden; ... Read More >

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